© Becky Beasley, Hide, from the series Surface Coverings / The Feral Works, 2004-06

© Becky Beasley, Maladie, from the series Surface Coverings / The Feral Works, 2004-06

“Becky Beasely’s work moves between sculpture and photography and originates in both personal and more universal encounters. Its subject matter is largely composed of autobiographical recollections mediated through literary references. Aesthetically it engages in a questioning of the relations between hand made objects and their (re)presentation as photographic objects. The language of her practice is at times noir with oneiric, dream state images in a low key sfumato of misty environments but bears equal references to surrealism and minimalism. Beasley’s work deals with death and fear using elements from the visual and the literary realms to allow her to meditate on issues of personal fate and destiny.
[…[
Beasley’s work needs to be assessed in a postminimal climate that is defined by the artworks’ desire to achieve the status of a document as a form of ‘present absentness’. Beasley’s project though does not fit in seamlessly with the postminimal program, as her photographic trajectory appears to move about the other way around, attempting to make the document coincide with the artwork. Her work transcends the imperatives of a documentary project altogether, and she uses photography and mimimalist sculpture’s ability to be reproduced or doubled, as an opportunity to produce slightly different versions of reality, shifting meanings in the process of negotiating content through the photographic process of projection and printing. Her work performs an incessant questioning of the relations between images and pictorial representations, in relation to personal stories and those of others and is able to touch upon the complexities surrounding the existence of different versions of the same image. It proposes an uncanny reading of the history of art, of literature and of personal memoirs by making them resonate in the sfumato of her allegorical photographic environment.”

text: office baroque gallery

More of Becky’s work here

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