┐ Dominic Nahr └

PAR396294© Dominic Nahr, EGYPT. Cairo. January 29, 2011. A protestor, using the Egyptian flag as a face mask, takes a break inside a building during protests against the government of Hosni Mubarak which pushed towards Tahir Square.

PAR396319© Dominic Nahr, EGYPT. Cairo. January 30, 2011. Protestors cover an Army tank while they chant and sing after another day of protests in Tahir Square.

PAR396316© Dominic Nahr, EGYPT. Cairo. January 30, 2011. The National Democratic Party building along the Nile can still be seen engulfed in flames a day after it was set on fire during clashes with police at protests against the government of Hosni Mubarak which pushed towards Tahir Square.

Looking back at the Egyptian uprising last year, as a entrance to think about current events.

“In the past year and a half, Egyptian society has achieved an unprecedented level of political consciousness. The revolutionary sentiment among the revolutionaries themselves — especially those who fought in the front-lines during the overthrow of Mubarak, and many of whom lost friends and/or family in the uprising — is particularly strong. So when the average Egyptian found out about Morsi’s decrees, they felt as though their struggle had been in vain. But rather than giving up, they took back to Tahrir — and started another sit-in.

But inside Egypt, the people are divided. A schism of epic proportions has developed between Morsi’s supporters and his detractors; a schism that has only now begun to surface. On the one side are the liberals, the leftists, the judges, the youth, intellectuals, and revolutionaries. On the other side are the Muslim Brotherhood members, sympathizers, and many of the poverty-stricken people who have been bought out with a kilo of sugar, bread, or (in the rare occasion) meat – the same people who were bought out on the day of the Camel attacks during the 18-day occupation of Tahrir Square.

The streets have once again become a small war-zone. Tear gas thrown by the police; Muslim Brotherhood militia attacking peaceful dissidents; stones and Molotov’s being thrown by the revolutionaries. But all of this happens as we await, whilst biting our nails, the position of the military. This, just like the beginning of the revolution, will tip the scales in either direction. If the military sides with the dissidents, Morsi will be unable to stand up against the people for long. His Pharaoh-like rule will come to and end as quickly as it came. But if the Egyptian military decides to side with Brotherhood, expect a civil war.”

excerpt of Nadim Fetaih‘s article In Tahrir, the beginning and end of a Pharaoh, in RoarMag. continue reading here

More of Dominic’s work here

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