≡ Sculpture & Photography: a love affair (part II) ≡

Roughly one year ago I made a post highlighting the love affair between photography and sculpture in contemporary art. The post featured artists that were part of the 2014 selection of Hyères Festival. In this second part what follows is a selection of work based on an exhibited curated on the theme Under Construction – New Positions in American Photography, organized by Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam and Pioneer Works Center for Art and Innovation, showcasing the work of ten artists from EUA and Canada. On the Foam website one can read:

“The far-reaching digitisation of society exerts an unparalleled influence on almost every aspect of the medium. This ranges from entirely new photographic techniques (digitisation of the equipment) and the use of the photographic image (distribution via digital networks) to the value and significance of photography itself (in view of the never-ending stream of many millions of photographic images that are being taken, distributed and manipulated every day). This fundamental reassessment is particularly appropriate and important in a society in which so much culturally relevant information is communicated via images and where an unprecedented and extremely complex dynamic has developed amongst images. In this new world, how can photography or a photograph be defined? What is the value and significance of photography? What is the role of the artist?

“These kinds of questions are of utmost relevance for this new generation of image makers who all represent very specific positions within a complex landscape. One of the most distinguishing features is that the image is constructed and built up from decontextualized elements. Furthermore its aesthetic qualities are largely determined by the use of abstract forms and colors. Whether the photograph is created entirely from scratch or whether it is put together using archetypal images, art history references, archive material or pictures derived from the internet, the end result is fragmented and layered. The artists make use of analogue or digital workflows, or a combination of both, often using advanced post-production software. With the introduction of three dimensionality as a self-evident addition, the photographic image is not always limited to a flat surface.

“The participants of Under Construction are in fact engaged with a reinvention of photography within a totally different societal context, taking account of more than 150 years of photographic history. It is no less than a photographic renaissance.”

I

svanderbeek43.jpg.pagespeed.ce.a98N5NV-g_© Sara VanDerBeek, Shift, 2014. Digital c-print.

svanderbeek40.jpg.pagespeed.ce.eXjerq5HES© Sara VanDerBeek, Turned Stairs/Pyramid Steps, 2014. Detail view.

svanderbeek41.jpg.pagespeed.ce.0v6mNUHpfq© Sara VanDerBeek, Ancient Objects, Still Lives. Installation view.

II

katesteciw_interview01© Kate Steciw, Springtime Entropy, 2009.C-Print.

katesteciw_interview04© Kate Steciw, abstract, assistance, bed rest, biology, blade, botanic, clean, clear, close-up, closeup, detail, dew, dew-drop, drop, droplet,
flora, foliage, fresh, green, grow, harmony, hope, leaf, life, light, macro, morning, mourning, nature, organic, pure, purity, purpose,
rain, reflections, scattered, spring, survival, water, warning, weather, wet”,
2012. C-Print.

III

Cut-(from-Picturing-the-Times-of-your-Life)© Sara Cwynar, Cut (from picturing the times of your life), from the project Flat Death.

Toucan-in-Nature-(Post-it-notes)© Sara Cwynar, Toucan in Nature (post it notes), from the project Flat Death.

Contemporary-Floral-Arrangement-1-(Many-Perrenials-can-be-used-in-arrangements-such-as-this-for-winter-decoration)© Sara Cwynar, Contemporary Floral Arrangement 1, from the project Flat Death.

IV

26089-1391119124-05TOPIARY© Cynthia Talmadge and Matthew Leifheit, Fruit Topiary (Bosc Pears).

IMG-0633-INVspread© Cynthia Talmadge and Matthew Leifheit, Untitled (topiary), 2013.

V

Crescnent_Eyed_Portrait© Daniel Gordon, Crescent Eyed Portrait. C-print, from the project Back to the Green Line, M+B, Los Angeles, 2013.

banana© Daniel Gordon, Bananas. C-print, from the project Back to the Green Line, M+B, Los Angeles, 2013.

Artichokes_and_Leeks© Daniel Gordon, Artichokes and Leeks. C-print, from the project Back to Screen Selections and Still Lifes, Wallspace, New York, 2014.

VI

higherpictures_joshuacitarella_renderdifference© Joshua Citarella, Render and Difference, 2013, C-print.

23_HourglassLattice© Joshua Citarella, Hourglass in Lattice Configuration II, III & IV, 2015, C-print.

VII

LIPPS_Camera_700© Matt Lipps, Untitled, from the series Library.

LIPPS_03Heads_700© Matt Lipps, Untitled, from the series Horizon/s.

VIII

8863_1000© Jessica Eaton, Interpolation Dramatization 7, 2012. Archival pigment print.

8038_1000© Jessica Eaton, cfaal 306, 2013. Archival pigment print.

IX

porter_greet_the_dust© Matthew Porter, Greet the Dust, 2012. Archival pigment print.

porter-VonSternbergHouse-2-crop-fake-WEB© Matthew Porter, Von Sternberg House #2, 2012. Archival pigment print.

X

© Owen KyddRed Wall, Three Parts, 2013. Video on 40 inch display screen.

© Owen Kydd, Composition Warner Studio. Video on 40 inch display screen.

© Owen Kydd, Knife, 2011. Video on 40 inch display screen.

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