Caption (image above): lumen on expired 120 ektachrome film (by Sofia Silva)

 

More about Nobuhiro Nakanishi‘s work here

Nobuhiro Nakanishi: “The theme of my work is ‘the physical that permeates into the art piece.’ In a foggy landscape, we no longer see what we are usually able to see – the distance to the traffic light, the silhouette of the trees, the slope of the ground. Silhouettes, distance and horizontal sense all become vague. When we perceive this vagueness, the water inside the retina and skin dissolve outwardly toward the infinite space of the body surface. The landscape continues to flow, withholding us from grasping anything solid. By capturing spatial change and the infinite flow of time, I strive to produce art that creates movement between the artwork itself and the viewer’s experience of the artwork.” Source: http://www.kashyahildebrand.org

More about Mary Pinto‘s work here

Nobuhiro Nakanishi: “The theme of my work is “the physical that permeates into the art piece.” In a foggI strive to produce art that creates movement between the artwork itself and the viewer’s experience of the artwork.” Source: http://www.kashyahildebrand.org

More about Constanza Isaza Martínez‘s work here

Constanza Isaza Martínez: […] “The Silver Salts series takes the salted paper process as a starting point and uses the chemistry and paper alone to make images without negatives or camera. The resultant images – which draw attention to the surface and nature of the photographic image – reference the chemical and scientific aspects of early photography and allude, through the shapes contained within their circular frames, to the process of investigation and analysis which is a fundamental part of both science and photography.
Using the chemistry itself to form the image, each photograph is a one-off positive print without a negative – the only ‘negative’ being the fragile chemical formations on the surface of the print, which are destroyed during processing.” […]

More about Brian James Culbertson‘s work here

Brian James Culbertson: “I use my photographs to raise questions about the depersonalization in modern medicine, where psychotropic drugs are prescribed to individuals based solely on symptoms, regardless of the many differences in their physical or chemical makeup. Both the process and the end result highlight the danger of this one-size-fits-all approach. I create multi-layered portraits that are printed using the salted paper print process with prescription medications incorporated into the salt solution. The incorporation of medication used to alter the chemistry of the mind into the salted paper print process yields unpredictable results from print to print – just as it does with our own bodies.”

 

More about Kathryn Parker Almanas‘ work here

More about Sharon Lee Hart‘s work here

Sharon Lee Hart: “This series questions gender identities, interactions between humans and other animals, and mass media representations. Initially, I created photomontage pieces by hand, in the darkroom and/or on a scanner. Some works have moved towards fabricating small-scale photomontage models, which are photographed and printed digitally. The resulting photographs are reworked with traditional materials in order to bring about a more complex, layered depth, as well as to allow me to engage physically with the print. The velvety, deep black created by layers of charcoal is designed to enhance and obscure, just as the content of the work brings up issues that might be uncomfortable or accepted as the status quo.
Advertisements and the handmade mark, manipulation and destruction, beauty and deformity are melded together in this often dark and sometimes humorous series. The pieces re-contextualize photographic segments that are occasionally chosen from my own photographs, but are predominantly cut from popular magazines. The resulting works unravel conventional glossy presentations of sexuality and aesthetics that are often the backbone of such publications, offering a surreal, challenging alternative.”

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