⁞ How Kalen Hollomon’s collages reflect the general confusion about the core of a subversive attitude ⁞

Trying to make a point with digital cut and paste, here are excerpts of reviews and interviews with collage artist Kalen Hollomon, accompanied by images of his playful work. © Kalen Hollomon © Kalen Hollomon NYMAG: […] Hollomon claims it’s … Continue reading ⁞ How Kalen Hollomon’s collages reflect the general confusion about the core of a subversive attitude ⁞

٠ The ‘ancient’ art of cut & paste (using one’s own hands, if you can imagine) ٠

© Christine Gensheimer, Hunde, 2007. Photo-collage. © Christine Gensheimer, Eberhards, 2010. Photo-collage. © Maria Kassab, Fauve. Paper collage. © Maria Kassab, Sans-titre. Paper collage. © Maria Kassab, Slow This Bird Down, 2013. Photo-collage. © Isabel Reitemeyer, Herr A. und Frau … Continue reading ٠ The ‘ancient’ art of cut & paste (using one’s own hands, if you can imagine) ٠

┐ Laurie Kang, multiple folds and a print └

© Laurie Kang, Untitled, C-print, 2013 © Laurie Kang, Untitled form (Sufficiency), Chromogenic paper, clamp, nail, 2012 © Laurie Kang, Untitled Forms (Sufficiency) Chromogenic paper, nail, clamp and C-print, nail, clamp, 2013 © Laurie Kang, Psychogeographic Waterfall, C-prints, 16″ x 20″, 2011 © Laurie Kang, Confused archive, 2013 © Laurie Kang, Natural Image (Unknown duration, Found paper and binder’s board, 2013 Laurie’s website here Continue reading ┐ Laurie Kang, multiple folds and a print └

┐ Caitlin Rueter └

How To Be is a series of exercises that revisit and reimagine early 19th century primers for “young ladies.” I stumbled upon these manuals while researching 19th century etiquette books. Most include etiquette but only as part of a more comprehensive course of education. They were intended for upper-class girls and women who had few opportunities for formal schooling. Instead, girls took their lessons from these books, serials and pamphlets and from their mothers or older sisters at home. The manuals include subjects ranging from etiquette and fashion to archery and riding, from botany, entomology and mineralogy to painting, dancing … Continue reading ┐ Caitlin Rueter └

┐ Sara Rahbar └

© Sara Rahbar, Untitled, from the series Love arrived & How red, photography, 2008 © Sara Rahbar, Trapped in Dark Night with Nowhere to Run, I Have Died a Million Times Every Night in this Bed (left) + Kurdistan Flag #5 (right), from the series Flags, mixed media + textiles, 2005-2010 © Sara Rahbar, Solitary (left) + Anonymously yours (right), from the series Confessions of a Sinner, mixed media, 2011/12 Rahbar seems to meditate on the flag like a monk would stare at an icon. “It represents my father and so many, many promises and hopes of tomorrow … It … Continue reading ┐ Sara Rahbar └

┐ Jane Hammond └

© Jane Hammond, Self-Portrait with Twin, 2011 © Jane Hammond, Face Facts, 2006 © Jane Hammond, The Touch-Up, 2009 © Jane Hammond, Cabrito, 2007 © Jane Hammond, Chai Wan Three, 2008 all selenium toned silver gelatin prints “The photographs grew out of the scrapbooks, also. I began collecting photos to put in them, and quickly became obsessed with all the different depictions of the same thing. Soon, I had hundreds of snowmen pictures. I began collecting many more snapshots, other peoples pictures, and soon borrowed lots of my family’s own pictures. I began to think about them and in my … Continue reading ┐ Jane Hammond └

┐ Deborah Bohnert └

© Deborah Bohnert, Untitled, from the series Bohnert and Bohnert, 2005 © Deborah Bohnert, Untitled, from the series Bohnert and Bohnert, 2005 © Deborah Bohnert, Untitled, from the series The Little People, 2009 © Deborah Bohnert, Untitled, from the series The Little People, 2009 “…Dada had long operated according to the principle of instability, blurring distinctions between art and mass media (in photomontage), art and mass production (in the readymade), and intention and reception (in public provocations and spectacles). In 1921, Roman Jakobson characterized the movement as “transrational”—an indulgence in sheer relativity and paradox—citing Tristan Tzara as support: “I am … Continue reading ┐ Deborah Bohnert └

┐ Melinda Gibson └

© Melinda Gibson, from the project Photography as contemporary art, 2011 © Melinda Gibson, from the project Photography as contemporary art, 2011 If Melinda Gibson’s photomontages look familiar, don’t be surprised. A flash of Ed Burtynsky here, a slice of Juergen Teller there, they are all made up of elements of some of the major works of the 1990s and 2000s, culled from the pages of The Photograph As Contemporary Art. Written and edited by Charlotte Cotton (former curator at the V&A and LACMA, and now creative director of the UK’s National Media Museum), it is one of the key … Continue reading ┐ Melinda Gibson └

┐ Julie Cockburn └

© Julie Cockburn, The Veil, Embroidery on found photograph, 2011 © Julie Cockburn, The Astronaut, Embroidery on found photograph, 2011 “The loss of, or manipulation of, the human face is the most disturbing and fascinating aspect of Cockburn’s work. These faceless or masked portraits me of John Baldessari’s manipulated mass-media images. He often used colored dots, or other means, to cover faces, interrupting the viewer and de-personalizing the image. But Cockburn’s photographs seem to have the opposite effect. She often embroiders or cuts out shapes into a complex pattern, and this record of tedious physical labor draws me into her … Continue reading ┐ Julie Cockburn └

┐ Luuk Wilmering └

© Luuk Wilmering, Call it by it’s name nr. 1, from the series Birds need shelter, 2011 © Luuk Wilmering, Birdhunters, from the series Birds need shelter, 2011 “Luuk Wilmering‘s latest series, Bird Needs Shelter, was largely created during his work period in the Holsboer studio in the Cité des Arts, Paris, in 2010/2011. Bird Needs Shelter is concerned with the duplicitous character of man‘s dealings with nature. In this four-part series, birds and our relationship with them form the central subject. The series shows how man, through ‗abuse of power‘, causes the extinction of certain species, how birds are … Continue reading ┐ Luuk Wilmering └