┐ we’re all in deep shit VII └

Still from Planète Parr

This country, my country, Portugal, is about to crash. I’ll give it a week. THE FINANCE MINISTER HAS JUST BAN THE CINEMATHEQUE FROM EXHIBITING DIGITAL SUBTITLES IN FOREIGN MOVIES, IN ORDER TO CUT COSTS. FOREIGN FILMS WILL BE FOREIGNER FROM NOW ON. SURREAL! FUCKING SURREAL!!!

┐ we’re all in deep shit VI └

as published in the front cover of the Portuguese newspaper I.

video of the happening here: “Celebrations to mark Portugal’s Republic Day took on an extra symbolic relevance when President Cavaco Silva unknowingly raised the country’s flag upside down. The internationally recognised signal of distress came on the last time October 5 will be deemed a public holiday having been abolished in an austerity measure.”

┐ Zoe Hatziyannaki └

© Zoe Hatziyannaki, The Parliament, from the series Secrets & Crises, 2010-20111


© Zoe Hatziyannaki, Police Headquarters, from the series Secrets & Crises, 2010-20111

“The photographs on the left side of the diptychs portray public/State buildings in Athens, Greece. The images on the right are enlarged window details taken from the buildings’ photographs. The juxtapositions of the two images seek to suggest the questionable role of the State and its institutions today in Greece. A role which is seriously disputed under the current crisis.
Public buildings stand as symbols of this crisis: they attract the rage of the protesters, they are being portrayed in photos of crisis related news etc. However, significations of public buildings vary depending on different periods in history, for example, in the past, some of the buildings depicted in the photographs used to stand for solidarity or prosperity. Therefore in this series my aim was that the depiction of the buildings would offer an as much as possible detached and a-historical view. Yet the blown-up, poor quality images of the windows on the right play a disturbing role. They are in a way scrutinizing the rather ‘innocent’ image of the building on the left, in order to find evidence of what or who is to blame. Hinting that the lives of those buildings are not so organized and tidy after all, that they have secrets and obscure operations, which even though more or less everybody share, there is always a vagueness about them, responsible for generating feelings of suspicion, resentment and fear, all of which are met at present in Greece.”

More of Zoe’s work here