٠ The ‘ancient’ art of cut & paste (using one’s own hands, if you can imagine) ٠

© Christine Gensheimer, Hunde, 2007. Photo-collage. © Christine Gensheimer, Eberhards, 2010. Photo-collage. © Maria Kassab, Fauve. Paper collage. © Maria Kassab, Sans-titre. Paper collage. © Maria Kassab, Slow This Bird Down, 2013. Photo-collage. © Isabel Reitemeyer, Herr A. und Frau … Continue reading ٠ The ‘ancient’ art of cut & paste (using one’s own hands, if you can imagine) ٠

٠ 21st century food styling ٠

© Henry Hargreaves, in collaboration with chef/stylist Caitlin Levin, from the series Mark Rice-Ko. © Henry Hargreaves, in collaboration with chef/stylist Caitlin Levin, from the series Mark Rice-Ko. © Sarah Anne Ward, in collaboration with food stylist Heather Meldrom, Pollock-rice krispie treats © Sarah Anne Ward, in collaboration with food stylist Heather Meldrom, Mondrian-jello jigglers  © Catherine Losing, from the series The Serpent That Ate Its Own Tail © Catherine Losing, from the series The Serpent That Ate Its Own Tail © Catherine Losing, from the series The Serpent That Ate Its Own Tail © Hong Yi (Red), Day 26, … Continue reading ٠ 21st century food styling ٠

٠ Sandro Ferreira, memory code: 6174 ٠

© Sandro Ferreira, Não lhe digas para onde vais amanhã (Don’t tell her where you’ll be tomorrow), from the project “6174” Set of a hundred booklets, with dimensions identical to those with speeches of some dignitaries of the Portuguese dictatorial regime: “Estado Novo”. © Sandro Ferreira, from the project 6174. The left card reads The useless, the right card reads The miserableA series of 126 “lobby cards”, corresponding to the 126 films that the soldier Manuel Rosa Simões had seen since his arrival in Angola until his departure for the Metropolis. Ironically, the first film was “Les Miserables” and the … Continue reading ٠ Sandro Ferreira, memory code: 6174 ٠

┐ Heidi Kirkpatrick └

© Heidi Kirkpatrick,Mother, 2001 © Heidi Kirkpatrick,Mahjong tiles, 2011 “Portland based photographerHeidi Kirkpatrick uses photographs to transform found objects into playful pieces of art. Her images reveal a view of the world experienced by women and she prints them on film positives which she mounts within or on found objectssuch as vintage tins, blocks, boxes, copper plates, dominos and children’s toys. These wonderfully unique pieces can be handled, arranged and adorned on a table rather than hanging on a wall, allowing each object to possess its own unique interactive charm. (…) Kirkpatrick has struggled with a fair amount of physical … Continue reading ┐ Heidi Kirkpatrick └