⁞ A selection of UK-based emerging photographers to watch (III) ⁞

© Jill Quigley, Untitled, from the series Cottages of Quigley’s Point. © Jill Quigley, Untitled, from the series Cottages of Quigley’s Point. © Oliver Smith, Untitled, from the series Looking for Ghosts. © Oliver Smith, Untitled, from the series Looking … Continue reading ⁞ A selection of UK-based emerging photographers to watch (III) ⁞

⁞ Identities defined by stereotipied ideas of nationality ⁞

Street Level Photoworks‘ upcoming exhibition is called Common Ground: New Documentary Photography from Scotland & Wales and is promoted as a show that brings together “diverse themes and ideas associated with distinctive national and cultural visual inspiration, this collective exhibition … Continue reading ⁞ Identities defined by stereotipied ideas of nationality ⁞

٠ Some Graduates Speak Photography ٠

Every year around this time there’s a fuzz in the visual arts in the UK due to all the Graduate shows. Journalists, gallery owners, collectors, travel the country to meet new flesh. By this time, Source photographic review also does its own show, an online showcase of the photography graduates from all over the UK. It’s a great way to see the trends in the academic world  (in case you’re interested in that) but, more important, to find visual artists who clearly stand out for the simple reason that they have their own language: they speak photography. Here’s my own … Continue reading ٠ Some Graduates Speak Photography ٠

┐ Ksenia Burnasheva’s Singles └

This work was suggested to me by Rotem Rozental, the working bee at the SIP blog :) The following is a re-post of Ksenia Burnasheva’s project Singles. © Ksenia Burnasheva, from the project Singles, 2009 – ongoing “I was born in an industrial city in the middle of the European part of Russia called Ufa where I was raised and spent most of my teenage years before moving to England six years ago. I moved from Ufa to Cambridge, where I studied foundation level art at the Cambridge School of Visual and Performing Art after which I then moved to … Continue reading ┐ Ksenia Burnasheva’s Singles └

┐ Will Jennings └

© Will Jennings, Untitled, from the series Tumbling Blocks, 2011 “As an intuitive response to the sudden death of my mother last summer I walked down the Suffolk coast, reconsidering the landscape of my childhood through the eyes of an adult, mourner and artist. Concrete cubes sporadically emerged along the route, sole man-made interjections in a landscape of permanent flux. As I walked through fog they offered perspective, their staccato rhythm implied passing time, their angular form suggested a grid and attempted rationalisation of chaotic, uncontrollable nature. I read the cubes as monolithic stelae. Blank vessels into which I store … Continue reading ┐ Will Jennings └

┐ Mary Stark – Searching for Celluloid └

Abandoned, discarded, unwanted film is woven into handmade artefacts and photographic prints are created in the darkroom from constructed negatives. Time becomes an integral element, with each print or object measuring a duration of film. This recent work explores the materiality of photography and film in the digital age and creates a dialogue between the still frame and the moving image. Mary Stark is searching for celluloid. It’s an exploration that, paradoxically, began in the digital space. “I was interested in working digitally with video,” says Stark, who recently completed an MA in Photography at MMU. “Then I realised that, … Continue reading ┐ Mary Stark – Searching for Celluloid └

┐ Edmund Clark └

© Edmund Clark, Inmate’s table, from the project Still Life Killing Time © Edmund Clark, Stairwell, from the project Still Life Killing Time © Edmund Clark, Shared Room, from the project Still Life Killing Time © Edmund Clark, from the project Still Life Killing Time “Edmund Clark’s Still Life: Killing Time is a quiet meditation on the slowness, the fabric and the accoutrements of prison life for elderly inmates. It was two years in the making.(…) The only statement I can find directly from Clark, the photographer, is worth meditation. What you can see in the pictures is to what … Continue reading ┐ Edmund Clark └

┐ Davide Monteleone – Northern Caucasus └

© David Monteleone, Daghestan, Russia, 2009. Ghimri, during a bull sacrifice © David Monteleone, Republic of Ingushetia, 2010. Nazran, during a wedding © David Monteleone, Republic of Chechnya, 2010. Old portrait of Sheik Mansur and Sheik Artzanov “At first there was the Russian Empire, Saint Petersburg’s splendour, nobles’ dynasties set against commons far and distant, scattered on an unlimited country. Later on came communism’s turn, with its pyramidal hierarchy, its ideology imposed without any discussion for a “superior common good” that revealed itself utopian and elusive. Walls and curtains finally fell down, but renewal’s winds were broken off by the … Continue reading ┐ Davide Monteleone – Northern Caucasus └

┐ Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker └

© Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker, from the series Sleeping Through an Earthquake, India, 2011 © Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker, from the series Sleeping Through an Earthquake, India, 2011 © Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker, from the series Sleeping Through an Earthquake, India, 2011 © Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker, from the series Sleeping Through an Earthquake, India, 2011 © Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker, from the series Sleeping Through an Earthquake, India, 2011 More of this work here Continue reading ┐ Daniel Evans & Brendan Baker └

┐ Craig Ritchie └

© Craig Ritchie, from the project Malaficia © Craig Ritchie, from the project Malaficia © Craig Ritchie, from the project Malaficia “In the Malaficia project, London based photographer Craig Ritchie delves into a Scottish area that was once a central location for witch trials and executions. This gruesome piece of history is not what first meets the eye when browsing through Ritchie’s images of East Neuk: the elegant houses, the forests, elderly people and other moments of daily lives. However, as Ritchie indicates in his website, “It took very little to be considered a witch; a ruined crop field, a … Continue reading ┐ Craig Ritchie └

┐ Minna Pöllänen └

© Minna Pöllänen, Hiltop, from the project Attempts, 2010 © Minna Pöllänen, Water, from the project Attempts, 2011 © Minna Pöllänen, Ice, from the project Attempts, 2010 “Made on an undeveloped 0.75-hectare piece of family land, Attempts maps out a survey into the notion of landownership. Through collecting, containing and marking different pieces of the landscape the project explores the various geographical and topographical elements found within the lot. The apparently futile constructions depicted in the photographs aim to visualise and question the often illogical commodification of nature and the ownership of something that exists in a constant state of … Continue reading ┐ Minna Pöllänen └

┐ “””hard-working home-owners””” └

© Graham Smith, (Boy) George O’Dowd at Great Titchfield Street squat. 1980 © Graham Smith, Kim Bowen at Warren Street squat 1980 © Graham Smith, Tony Hadley (Spandau Ballet) at a Warren Street squat, 1981 This weekend a new law came into force that makes squatting – the occupation of empty buildings by otherwise homeless people – a criminal offence. Previously a lesser civil offence, the new law confronts squatters with the possibility of a £5,000 fine or six months in prison, with ministers declaring that this will shut the door once and for all on squatters while helping protect … Continue reading ┐ “””hard-working home-owners””” └

┐ Bridget Collins └

@ Bridget Collins, Untitled, from Olly Olly Oxen Free @ Bridget Collins, Untitled, from Olly Olly Oxen Free Jonathan Baron, editor-in-chief of Baron Magazine: We are visually saying that emotions are not progressive, that instead of being emotional with others, let’s do it through entertainment. So for the debut issue – Baron has commissioned artists and photographers known for creating staged situations, who have reinstructed sex and the female nude for a viewer seeking emotions through entertainment not others. (…) We just came from a rather sexually repressed decade, where we seemed to travel back to the late fifties and … Continue reading ┐ Bridget Collins └

┐ Neeta Madahar └

@ Neeta Madahar, Sustenance #95, 2003 @ Neeta Madahar, Sustenance #97, 2003 “Neeta Madahar’s subjects in Sustenance are quite ordinary—ordinary birds like finches, cardinals and blue jays. Her setting, too, is ordinary—her Boston backyard. But what makes this British artist’s work extraordinary is the sense of wonder and magic she creates despite these unexceptional circumstances. It was this push-pull of opposing forces—the ordinary and the extraordinary, the quotidian and the fantastic—that drew me into this stunning collection of fourteen photographs. (…) Birds are the perfect symbol for duality. They simultaneously belong to two worlds: Air and Land (and sometimes Water). … Continue reading ┐ Neeta Madahar └

┐ Davide Maione └

© Davide Maione, Reaching © Davide Maione, Beaten (left) and Appeal (right), from Outlines and Annotations © Davide Maione, What it takes to keep a young girl alive “What It Takes to Keep a Young Girl Alive is a diptych of photographs that takes its title from a short story by Jayne Anne Phillips. Whilst being the departing point for creating a link between portraiture, narrative and performance, Phillips’ short story functions as fictional milieu for exploring notions of selfhood and subjectivity. The diptych seizes on the very essence of Phillips’ story: the repetitive gestures of menial labour, the dead end job … Continue reading ┐ Davide Maione └

┐ El Plus En └

© Luke Norman & Nik Adam, Untitled, from the project Ellerker Gardens, 2011 © Luke Norman & Nik Adam, Untitled, from the project Ellerker Gardens, 2011 © Luke Norman & Nik Adam, Untitled, from the project Ellerker Gardens, 2011 “We wanted to focus on the ‘in-between’, the volatile state of mind in which instability manifests itself, where an uncertain state of mind can produce dark and bizarre outcomes,” says Norman. “The idea is all about letting go; you have to fall out of reality to engage with the pictures – the pictures are there to trigger thoughts inside your head,” … Continue reading ┐ El Plus En └

┐ Melinda Gibson └

© Melinda Gibson, from the project Photography as contemporary art, 2011 © Melinda Gibson, from the project Photography as contemporary art, 2011 If Melinda Gibson’s photomontages look familiar, don’t be surprised. A flash of Ed Burtynsky here, a slice of Juergen Teller there, they are all made up of elements of some of the major works of the 1990s and 2000s, culled from the pages of The Photograph As Contemporary Art. Written and edited by Charlotte Cotton (former curator at the V&A and LACMA, and now creative director of the UK’s National Media Museum), it is one of the key … Continue reading ┐ Melinda Gibson └

┐ Julie Cockburn └

© Julie Cockburn, The Veil, Embroidery on found photograph, 2011 © Julie Cockburn, The Astronaut, Embroidery on found photograph, 2011 “The loss of, or manipulation of, the human face is the most disturbing and fascinating aspect of Cockburn’s work. These faceless or masked portraits me of John Baldessari’s manipulated mass-media images. He often used colored dots, or other means, to cover faces, interrupting the viewer and de-personalizing the image. But Cockburn’s photographs seem to have the opposite effect. She often embroiders or cuts out shapes into a complex pattern, and this record of tedious physical labor draws me into her … Continue reading ┐ Julie Cockburn └

┐ Walter Hugo └

© Walter Hugo, Oli Sims, from “reflecting the bright lights” © Walter Hugo, Natalie Darby, from “reflecting the bright lights” “In order to create the portraits, his sitters must stare at a bright light for 10 seconds without blinking, creating an intense and concentrated glare, a glass window into their souls. (…) Can you talk us through the process of making a glass photograph? Ok, I’ll try and simplify this as much as possible as it’s quite a scientific process. The process I’ve developed pre-dates modern photography, it’s from around 1850. First I had to build a camera, in order … Continue reading ┐ Walter Hugo └

┐ Nicky Coutts └

© Nicky Coutts, Estates(Syon), 2007 © Nicky Coutts, Estates(Longleat), 2007 “The photograph Estates was based on 17th century drawings and paintings of stately homes originally commissioned to show them to their most opulent advantage. Each original is manipulated to look like a tower by copying and repeating the floors and placing them one above the other.” source: Danielle Arnaud more of Nicky’s work here Continue reading ┐ Nicky Coutts └

┐ Clare Strand └

© Clare Strand, Signs of Struggle, 2003 © Clare Strand, Signs of Struggle, 2003 AFH: Is photography primarily an expressive tool for you? CS: Photography clearly has an important role in my work but its application is determined by my subject matter. If you look back on my work, I have no one photographic style. I tend to manipulate the process to directly respond to the subject. Throughout my work I have appropriated existing photographic conventions to suit and embellish the subject. The majority of the conventions that I ‘borrow’ are sourced from the utilitarian applications of photography. AFH: Do … Continue reading ┐ Clare Strand └