┐ Peter Puklus, Handbook to the Stars └

© Peter Puklus, Handbook to the Stars “There is a reason why Peter Puklus’ first publication is called Handbook to the Stars, a subtle manifesto of his Ars Poetica. With this handbook he attempts to portray his own universe and provide insight into how his photographic works relate to each other: like galaxies in relative proximity to one another that are bound together by their own gravitational force. The images function alongside one another and through one another, have no sequence or chronology, but exist individually even as they form interconnections and follow their own patterns. Hence they do not … Continue reading ┐ Peter Puklus, Handbook to the Stars └

┐ Emile Barret – photography as an experience └

© Emile Barret, from the series Magnet3 © Emile Barret, from the series Magnet3 © Emile Barret, from the series La Vanité est un Plaisir des Reins © Emile Barret, from the series La Vanité est un Plaisir des Reins © Emile Barret, from the series La Disparition © Emile Barret, from the series La Disparition This MAN’s work is such a breath of fresh air I don’t even know which of his works not to post. Emile’s website here Continue reading ┐ Emile Barret – photography as an experience └

┐ Caitlin Rueter └

How To Be is a series of exercises that revisit and reimagine early 19th century primers for “young ladies.” I stumbled upon these manuals while researching 19th century etiquette books. Most include etiquette but only as part of a more comprehensive course of education. They were intended for upper-class girls and women who had few opportunities for formal schooling. Instead, girls took their lessons from these books, serials and pamphlets and from their mothers or older sisters at home. The manuals include subjects ranging from etiquette and fashion to archery and riding, from botany, entomology and mineralogy to painting, dancing … Continue reading ┐ Caitlin Rueter └

┐ Jacinda Russell └

© Jacinda Russell, Strange Artifacts: A Photographic and Found Object @ J. Crist Gallery, installation view + details, Idaho, 2007 The wunderkammer or “room of wonder” draws heavily upon 16th century European cabinets of curiosity. I combined digital photography with found object sculpture by printing on canvas and encasing the images in weathered boxes, suitcases, drawers, and crates. Objects like false teeth, steering wheels, anonymous sculptures of naked bandits, jars of paint chips, sculpted cotton, and skull necklaces form the installation. All 50 of the objects are influential in defining my childhood and adult years, the various places I have … Continue reading ┐ Jacinda Russell └

┐ Jean-Noël Pazzi └

© Jean-Noël Pazzi, figure 5 – les cadavres exquis, from the project In(ter)vention © Jean-Noël Pazzi, forêt 6 – paysage, from the project In(ter)vention © Jean-Noël Pazzi, figure 3 – les cadavres exquis, from the project In(ter)vention “Ménager les site frappés de croyance comme indispensable territoire d’errement de l’esprit. Gilles Clément Manifeste du tiers paysage Cela aurait pu être une belle histoire, un doux romantisme entre l’homme et la nature. Mais il n’en est rien. Je trafique, reconstruis et extrais. Je recherche des formes à construire ou à mettre en lumière. La nature a toujours été mon terrain de jeu; … Continue reading ┐ Jean-Noël Pazzi └

┐ El Plus En └

© Luke Norman & Nik Adam, Untitled, from the project Ellerker Gardens, 2011 © Luke Norman & Nik Adam, Untitled, from the project Ellerker Gardens, 2011 © Luke Norman & Nik Adam, Untitled, from the project Ellerker Gardens, 2011 “We wanted to focus on the ‘in-between’, the volatile state of mind in which instability manifests itself, where an uncertain state of mind can produce dark and bizarre outcomes,” says Norman. “The idea is all about letting go; you have to fall out of reality to engage with the pictures – the pictures are there to trigger thoughts inside your head,” … Continue reading ┐ El Plus En └

┐ Victoria Jenkins └

© Victoria Jenkins, Capnomancy, from Images from the Institute of Esoteric Research © Victoria Jenkins, Aeromancy, from Images from the Institute of Esoteric Research “A characteristic claimed to be unique of photography has been its ability to record the visible, material world, its perceived objectivity and accuracy has lead to a utilitarian application of the camera as a tool for documentation, and this can be traced back to photography’s early history. Parallel to this is a history that echoes with illusion and trickery; photography carries a false empiricism, for which we may allow our guard to be dropped. The photographs … Continue reading ┐ Victoria Jenkins └

┐ Li Yun └

© Li Yun, For Individual Use, from the series Impermanent Instant, 2008 © Li Yun, Connecting Wire, from the series Impermanent Instant, 2008 “We Chinese people are struggling in the whirlpool of cynicism with no exception. This is my understanding of the current times. With frenzied emotions and twisted bodies, we are marching forward with vigorous strides. While people are gaining tremendous amount of self-satisfaction in all respects, what emerges behind is a deeper sense of dissatisfaction and helplessness. All this is because that we always have some in-born things left to be fulfilled while the reality cannot be altered. … Continue reading ┐ Li Yun └

┐ Jiang Zhi └

© Jiang Zhi, On the white #4, 2007 © Jiang Zhi, Love Letters No.6, 2011 “Oneness and unity only rests in ‘word’, never in the ‘matter’. I recall a conversation with a neurologist about whether ‘insanity’ exists, and if it did, how. We arrive at an interesting concept, that we were not very interested in the notion of ‘insanity’ itself, in other words, to us, ‘insanity’ in ‘general’ does not exist. ‘Insanity’ only exists in ‘situations’ and ‘conditions’, that is, ‘who’, ‘with whom’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, ‘why not’…? Only in these ‘wholes’, ‘situations’ and ‘assemblages’ does the word ‘insanity’ has … Continue reading ┐ Jiang Zhi └

┐ Chen Wei └

© Chen Wei, Broken Aquarium, from the series Everyday, Scenery and Props, 2009 © Chen Wei, Idol behind the curtains, from the series Everyday, Scenery and Props, 2009 “The photography/installation works of 31-year old artist Chen Wei illustrate an intricate imagination fascinated with the eccentric and fanciful pursuits of early science, mathematics, alchemy, philosophers and madmen. Taxidermy, broken mirrors, melted wax, bats, bees, deserted bedrooms, and found objects become the artist’s tableau. With a meticulous attention to details, Chen Wei creates mesmerizing scenes that leave the viewer puzzled by their intricate narrative, fantastic visual impact and odd beauty. In some … Continue reading ┐ Chen Wei └

┐ Kevin Van Aelst └

I don’t usually post on photographers whose work is being highlighted by other photography bloggers, since people who visit this place are often the same. I like to offer something else, and for that I trust my own parallel research. There are times like this when I shred that “rule” to pieces given the impact the work has on me. Here’s Kevin’s work, found in Lenscratch © Kevin Van Aelst, Tragedies, 2009 © Kevin Van Aelst, Cemetery, 2010 Artist Kevin Van Aelst is not one to cry over spilled milk. More likely, Van Aelst has “spilled” the milk himself and … Continue reading ┐ Kevin Van Aelst └

┐ Melinda Gibson └

© Melinda Gibson, from the project Photography as contemporary art, 2011 © Melinda Gibson, from the project Photography as contemporary art, 2011 If Melinda Gibson’s photomontages look familiar, don’t be surprised. A flash of Ed Burtynsky here, a slice of Juergen Teller there, they are all made up of elements of some of the major works of the 1990s and 2000s, culled from the pages of The Photograph As Contemporary Art. Written and edited by Charlotte Cotton (former curator at the V&A and LACMA, and now creative director of the UK’s National Media Museum), it is one of the key … Continue reading ┐ Melinda Gibson └

┐ Anne Collier └

© Anne Collier, Questions (Viewpoint), 2011 © Anne Collier, Questions (Evidence), 2011 © Anne Collier, Questions (Connection), 2011 “I only work in the studio and use a large-format plate camera. It’s a very laborious process that allows almost no room for improvisation. Everything has to be perfectly aligned and calibrated. I’m typically photographing things that are two-dimensional: book and magazine covers, record sleeves, film stills, etc. or objects that have very little physical depth such as the developing trays or audio cassette tapes. I’m interested in this flatness. My approach to making images is very influenced – and informed – … Continue reading ┐ Anne Collier └

┐ Pat Brassington └

© Pat Brassington, Untitled, from the series Cambridge Road, 2007 © Pat Brassington, Untitled, from the series Cambridge Road, 2007 “In most of her ‘artist’s statements’ and the rare interviews in press, Brassington mentions her engagement with both surrealism and psychoanalysis. But there is no allegiance, no endorsement, no salute to the father. Everything is troubled in one way or another: from horror imagery that is violent and abject, through the hauntingly strange and uncanny, to the hideous, the hilarious and the banal. Brassington interrogates and extrapolates on the psychoanalytic in extreme ways: orifices exhale, threaten and protrude; the feminine … Continue reading ┐ Pat Brassington └

┐ Clare Strand └

© Clare Strand, Signs of Struggle, 2003 © Clare Strand, Signs of Struggle, 2003 AFH: Is photography primarily an expressive tool for you? CS: Photography clearly has an important role in my work but its application is determined by my subject matter. If you look back on my work, I have no one photographic style. I tend to manipulate the process to directly respond to the subject. Throughout my work I have appropriated existing photographic conventions to suit and embellish the subject. The majority of the conventions that I ‘borrow’ are sourced from the utilitarian applications of photography. AFH: Do … Continue reading ┐ Clare Strand └

┐ Caï Hongshuo └

© Caï Hongshuo, New Anecdote of Social Talk, n°17, 2008 © Caï Hongshuo, Work ladder to the heaven, 2008 “L’œuvre photographique de Caï est cohérente et stylistiquement reconnaissable. Focalisé sur les jeux de lumières et de contrastes proposés par le noir et blanc, l’artiste nous propose des clichés semblant sortir d’un univers fantastique et onirique. Il se passionne pour la zoologie et nous offre un regard différent sur la faune et la flore. L’animal et le paysage sont ainsi transfigurés par le biais d’un appareil à rayons X. Ses photographies sont révélatrices de l’attachement de l’artiste aux traditions culturelles de … Continue reading ┐ Caï Hongshuo └

┐ Jan von Holleben └

© Jan von Holleben, Untitled #14, from the series Mystery of Monsters, 2009 © Jan von Holleben, Untitled #15, from the series Mystery of Monsters, 2009 “Like amateur pornography, the pleasure of von Holleben’s work derives from its honesty. “People appreciate I’m not over-constructing an image: changing it in Photoshop 25 times, and their sense of reality alongside. I’m mucking around, but I’m not trying to cheat anyone (…) Play shapes von Holleben’s worldview – he sees it as a way to explore selfhood, relationships and ultimately reality. “Alongside Homo sapiens exists Homo ludens – the person who understands himself … Continue reading ┐ Jan von Holleben └

┐ Luuk Wilmering └

© Luuk Wilmering, Call it by it’s name nr. 1, from the series Birds need shelter, 2011 © Luuk Wilmering, Birdhunters, from the series Birds need shelter, 2011 “Luuk Wilmering‘s latest series, Bird Needs Shelter, was largely created during his work period in the Holsboer studio in the Cité des Arts, Paris, in 2010/2011. Bird Needs Shelter is concerned with the duplicitous character of man‘s dealings with nature. In this four-part series, birds and our relationship with them form the central subject. The series shows how man, through ‗abuse of power‘, causes the extinction of certain species, how birds are … Continue reading ┐ Luuk Wilmering └

┐ Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge └

© Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge, 1909, from the series Work in Progress, 1980 © Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge, 1956, from the series Work in Progress, 1980 “Work in Progress is a short history of working women from 1909 to 1979. Each decade is represented by a different woman posed in a kitchen in which the props change with each period. Each image has a window into which a documentary photo indicates the politics of the period, a calendar that indicates the predominant type of work in which women were employed and a family photo that indicates the family … Continue reading ┐ Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge └

┐ Anne Leighton Massoni └

© Anne Leighton Massoni, Summer’s calling wishful pennies, from the series Holding Nancy © Anne Leighton Massoni, Woman wind woodard warehouse, from the series Holding Hila © Anne Leighton Massoni, My prom sunday promenade, from the series Holding Leighton “I’m interested in combining photographs i’ve made of empty spaces (spaces once inhabited or currently inhabited, but with no one present) with found photographs of times that no longer exist (images that are empty of personal memory) and then inking a thin line (in this case white) to draw a literal point of connection from one image to the next. the … Continue reading ┐ Anne Leighton Massoni └

┐ Alastair Whitton └

© Alastair Whitton, Untitled #6, from the series Patmos and the War at Sea, 2009 © Alastair Whitton, Untitled #10, from the series Patmos and the War at Sea, 2009 © Alastair Whitton, Untitled #37, from the series Patmos and the War at Sea, 2009 “So, on the left hand side we have this multi-layered code, drawing attention perhaps to the opacity of things, the difficulty of finding meaning. On the right hand side, by contrast, we have – a photograph! In most cases the “meaning” of the photograph is clear: it “is” an aeroplane, a soldier; sometimes the observer … Continue reading ┐ Alastair Whitton └

┐ Dalila Gonçalves #2 └

© Dalila Gonçalves, #1, from the series Paper Memories, 2009 © Dalila Gonçalves, #7, from the series Paper Memories, 2009 “In my last project, “Memories of Paper”, I photograph façades, recesses of buildings, more or less degraded, and print these captures on ordinary paper. Then I crumple and throw them away as waste part of a construction process. After this, in an act of historical rescue, I photograph them once again, giving them a new shape, a new weight, a new dimension. I question the frontiers between present and past, between memory, remembrance and oblivion.” More of Dalila’s work can … Continue reading ┐ Dalila Gonçalves #2 └

┐ Becky Beasley └

© Becky Beasley, Hide, from the series Surface Coverings / The Feral Works, 2004-06 © Becky Beasley, Maladie, from the series Surface Coverings / The Feral Works, 2004-06 “Becky Beasely’s work moves between sculpture and photography and originates in both personal and more universal encounters. Its subject matter is largely composed of autobiographical recollections mediated through literary references. Aesthetically it engages in a questioning of the relations between hand made objects and their (re)presentation as photographic objects. The language of her practice is at times noir with oneiric, dream state images in a low key sfumato of misty environments but … Continue reading ┐ Becky Beasley └

┐ John Divola └

© John Divola, The Little Man, 1987-89 © John Divola, Rock Falling Through Water, View From The Bottom Of the Pond Looking Up, 1989 “This body of work is based on some personal observations about photographs. I am fascinated by the concept of the photograph as an impression from, or remnant of, that which it describes. To stretch a metaphor – the photograph as an object has an relationship to that which it represents something like the relationship the snake skin has to the snake that sheds it. The relationship of something dead to something living. I would like to … Continue reading ┐ John Divola └