٠ The repetition & banality of the snapshot vs the originality & singularity of the fine print ٠

This post is made of excerpts from Lynn Berger‘s article “SNAPSHOTS, or: Visual Culture’s Cliché,” published in Photographies Vol. 4, No. 2, September 2011, pp.175–190. Images from unknown authors, from the MOMA online archive.  © Unknown photographer, c.1930 “We use the word “cliché” advisedly. As it happens, the genealogies of the cliché — an “expression or idea that has lost its originality or force through overuse” (American Heritage Dictionary)—and the snapshot go back to the same point of origin: the printing workshops of nineteenth century France. There, cliché was the name of the metal plate or mould on the printing press … Continue reading ٠ The repetition & banality of the snapshot vs the originality & singularity of the fine print ٠

٠ The political function of landscape-family photographs in the context of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict ٠

© Gil Pasternak, Esther Pasternak, 1970s. Esther Pasternak collection of family photographs, 1946–99. Description: The defiant lion is a tombstone monument erected in 1932 to commemorate a group of eight Jewish pioneer settlers who, as the Israeli version of the … Continue reading ٠ The political function of landscape-family photographs in the context of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict ٠

٠ The photo-finders as the inauthentic photographers ٠

Le Fabuleux album d’Amélie Poulain […] The photo-finders will refer to themselves as artists or curators, editors or collectors—often, as an unclassifiable mixture. Depending on their self-described status, the archives of found, anonymous photographs they produce will be labeled works … Continue reading ٠ The photo-finders as the inauthentic photographers ٠

┐ roots & fruits #13 – Ricardo Baltazar └

© Ricardo Baltazer, all Untitled, from the series Touching from a Distance, 2012 Ricardo’s project Touching from a Distance was shot in Essen, Germany, in 2012. All images are blow-ups of snapshots he took while paving the streets. Inevitably, they refer to the distance between the author and the subject portrayed, as they speak about the desire to get closer. These blow-ups are attempted gazes, attempts at assuring the account of oneself while trying to look at his surroundings. They are as much voyeuristic as they are introspective, in the sense that what one does while looking desperately out, is … Continue reading ┐ roots & fruits #13 – Ricardo Baltazar └

┐ Mark Peckmezian’s youth on “youth” └

© Mark Peckmezian, Untitled, © Mark Peckmezian, Untitled, chromogenic print >© Mark Peckmezian, Untitled, fiber gelatin silver print >© Mark Peckmezian, Untitled, @ G20, fiber gelatin silver print © Mark Peckmezian, Untitled, fiber gelatin silver print “I was thinking that the “straight” or naive approach to the theme would be to just play to popular conceptions or idealizations of youth — and I certainly have photos that do that. I used to make a lot of work like this. But in the past few years, I don’t know….I don’t really buy it anymore, I guess. I think a lot of … Continue reading ┐ Mark Peckmezian’s youth on “youth” └

┐ Five Year Photo Project └

1982 1992 2007 Long before digital cameras and posing memes like planking existed, they were just five guys on a lake with their entire lives stretched out before them. A photo capturing these five friends — John Wardlaw, Mark Rumer, Dallas Burney, John Molony and John Dickson — went on to spawn a 30-year-long photo tradition the friends plan to continue doing until they die. Every five years since the original photo was taken in July 1982, the men gather at Copco Lake (near the California and Oregon border) to recreate the odd photo. Each man as a stern expression; … Continue reading ┐ Five Year Photo Project └

┐ Leigh Ledare └

© Leigh Ledare, Me and mom in photobooth, 2008 © Leigh Ledare, Mom and me in mirror, 2002 “Indeed, Ledare’s work reveals signs that the relationship between mother and son is also one of professional complicity. In an interview printed on the book’s cover, Peterson defines herself as the ‘model’ who is ‘working her butt off’. At the same time, photo-booth strips of Ledare and his mother mugging for the camera and making out like teenagers provide glimpses of the pair as willing co-conspirators. Such insertions create a layer of artifice that unsettles the raw, confessional mode that Ledare seems … Continue reading ┐ Leigh Ledare └

┐ Nigel Grimmer └

© Nigel Grimmer, Julie, Golders Green,, from the series Roadkill Family Album, 2001 © Nigel Grimmer, Eric, Big Bend, from the series Roadkill Family Album, 2010 “Nigel Grimmer takes the conventions of family album snap photography and gives them a weird twist that is at times amusing and at others faintly unnerving. Here the self-conscious poses, the banal compositions, the suburban settings are infiltrated with the kinds of surrealistic incongruities that one might experience in particularly bizarre or embarrassing dreams. His Roadkill Family Album is a collection of prone portraits of family members dolled up in joke shop animal masks … Continue reading ┐ Nigel Grimmer └