┐ If the erect penis is not ‘wholesome’ enough to go into museums it should not be considered ‘wholesome’ enough to go into women └

© Robert Mapplethorpe, portrait of Louise Bourgeois, 1982 “Nearly a decade later, Fillette would figure prominently in a photographic portrait of Bourgeois by Robert Mapplethorpe. The portrait, in which the (then-) seventy-year-old artist smiles mischievously for the camera while carrying the sculpture in the crook of her arm, was commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art as the frontispiece to its catalogue for Bourgeois’s 1982-83 retrospective. What MoMA printed in its catalogue, however, was a tightly cropped detail of the portrait focusing on Bourgeois’s face. Fillette was excised from the image altogether.14 By placing Mapplethorpe ‘s 1982 photograph (and its … Continue reading ┐ If the erect penis is not ‘wholesome’ enough to go into museums it should not be considered ‘wholesome’ enough to go into women └

┐ Patty Carroll – Anonymous Women └

© Patty Carroll, Untitled, from the series Anonymous Women © Patty Carroll, Untitled, from the series Anonymous Women © Patty Carroll, Untitled, from the series Anonymous Women “Anonymous Women” is a series of “Un-portraits” as Carroll calls them, of women draped – entirely covered – in various fabrics, with minimum props. Lush fabrics, an unlimited color palette and an at times subtle to overt sense of humor infuses the work with a fresh, lingering impact on the viewer. Even though viewers “gaze” at these portraits of women (portraits are politically loaded art objects, which when spoken of become terms, with … Continue reading ┐ Patty Carroll – Anonymous Women └

┐ Tarrah Krajnak and Wilka Roig └

© Tarrah Krajnak and Wilka Roig, Object of Investigation (from Hysteria Collection), 2006 © Tarrah Krajnak and Wilka Roig, State 5 (from Hysteria Collection), 2008 “In Hysteria Collection we look back to the beginnings of the representation of women, to the constructed documentation of the sick Victorian woman. This simulated hysterical condition and the constructed image of the sickly woman was devised to prove an invented feminine affliction. We perform the hysterical body drawn from its historical context and place it in a contemporary context to resurface the historical reference as well as uncover the formulas that yield the recurring … Continue reading ┐ Tarrah Krajnak and Wilka Roig └

┐ Tarrah Krajnak and Danielle Julian-Norton └

© Tarrah Krajnak and Danielle Julian-Norton, Alone (Heart Abortion), 2010 © Tarrah Krajnak and Danielle Julian-Norton, Untitled (Heart Abortion), 2010 Suite42 is a collaborative founded in 2009 by Tarrah Krajnak and Danielle Julian-Norton. Their collaborative performance based projects explore the struggle of the artist within a contemporary context and the process of collaboration itself. Their invented characters are mined from the history of conceptual performance art and popular film. They displace these characters within absurd narratives referencing the artist at work, the psychology of relationships, and the tension of meaning and meaninglessness as a central dilemma. Tarrah’s work here and … Continue reading ┐ Tarrah Krajnak and Danielle Julian-Norton └

┐ Olivia Hicks └

© Olivia Hicks © Olivia Hicks “Using architectural theory as point of departure, my work explores the permeabilities between the body, complex emotional states and architectural spaces. I am interested in the sculptural idea of the room as a container or vessel, which objects and emotions can pour in and out of, and drain, leak or overflow. At the same time I am interested in the status of the body itself as a container, where the skin is a membrane that holds us together. I make fetish-like objects, which inhabit a dark architectural space that uses ideas of ‘apotropaic’ (protective) … Continue reading ┐ Olivia Hicks └

┐ Marisa Portolese └

© Marisa Portolese, Maya, from the series Imagined Paradise © Marisa Portolese, Celia, from the series Imagined Paradise “The Imagined Paradise series is about having an aesthetic experience that is surreal and attainable only through flight of the imagination. The images present the viewer with two distinct universes, the real and imagined. The subjects are solemn, still, contemplative and in awe. Their desire to escape is evident by what they see through the mind’s eye. And what they pine for is a place that is ethereal, vibrant, effervescent, but also beyond reach, fantastical and larger than life.” More of Marisa’s … Continue reading ┐ Marisa Portolese └